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When Doctor Decided To Put My Insuln For Type 2

When Doctor Decided To Put My Insuln For Type 2

when my doctor decided to put me on insulin for type 2 diabetes after metformin will that be used in the treatment and when insulin is introduced are your hospitalized to show how its done and dose yourself correctly concerned - will you have to learn to use needles for insuln pump or type 2 more pills

A DiabetesTeam Member said:

The doctors office should teach you how to use everything. Now are you just taking shots or are they putting you on an insulin pump? I was taking shots 3 to 5 times a day and they never put me on a pump. So I'm not exactly sure how the pump works but I have seen where they have pumps that are like the Dexcom or Freestyle test kits.

posted 9 months ago
A DiabetesTeam Member said:

Lots of techniques to make sticking finger less painful.let me know if you need them

posted 9 months ago
A DiabetesTeam Member said:

Thank goodness! We've mistakenly left it out a couple of times, and found it the next morning. Tonight we had a failure to launch. My husband decided to start putting on the new sensor, while I was busy recording the latest blood glucose number on his chart. He neglected to remove the paper off the back which makes it adhere to his skin. Once he activated the button, the probe came out through the back of the paper, but it didn't stick. Sometimes he needs to be more patient and things will be done properly. One can't rush applying a sensor. We'll pick up a refill tomorrow at 1000, but this means more finger sticks until he's back on his monitor. 🙁

posted 9 months ago
A DiabetesTeam Member said:

Once you start using an insulin pen it does not have to be refrigerated.It has a shelf life of a month at room temp.
That's all makes of insulin pen.

posted 9 months ago
A DiabetesTeam Member said:

My husband was diagnosed with type 2, in late June. He was started on insulin about 1 month later, after diet and exercise didn't seem to be bringing him into a normal range. His insulin was increased from 10mL to 20mL, after 1 month.
This could have been because of his age -81- and also his pre existing health problems- pneumonia, blood clots, heart problems and colon cancer. He's now on the G6 monitor and likes it. His goal is to be consistently below 100, which he hasn't reached. He's been below 100 many times, but goes up as soon as he eats. I'm wondering how long he'll stay on this once a day regime of insulin. The doctor wants tighter control of his blood sugar. Changes may be in the offing.
When this new life as a diabetic started, we had a visiting nurse come to our house to show my husband what to do. She came 3 times, until we were sure we could administer insulin properly and also apply the G6monitor successfully, and do finger pricks. This wasn't covered by insurance, but was well worth the money. She had dietary suggestions, also, but a dietician would have been even better. Covid-19 restrictions have greatly affected Montgomery County MD, and the way doctors /nurses see patients. Many patients are still being seen only online. Not the ideal format. We had a face to face office visit., thankfully.
I'm sure our doctor will advise us to hire an aide/nurse to assist with training, should the regime change. We know nothing of the various diabetes drugs or about an insulin pump.
One does have to notify their doctor if he has prescribed something unfamiliar, especially if you are dealing with an elderly patient. We learned that the insulin pens don't go bad if left out of the refrigerator over night, by mistake, which happened to us. The pharmacist said they have a 34 day shelf life. She looked it up. That's nice to know. This applies only to Tresiba flex touch pens, that I know of. Maybe other makers also have a long shelf life, out of refrigeration. Normally they are kept under refrigeration.
I have learned from reading other's stories, about how many things work. A patient can often describe events better than a person who hasn't had diabetes.
Another bit of advice, is to keep all the booklets and information guides that come with the G6 system. Keep all your prescription labels for refills. One also has to write down or keep the serial number of the G6 sensor being used. It's a piece of paper one removes so the sensor pad can be applied to one's skin. It's easy to misplace, and the G6 won't work without that serial number.

posted 9 months ago
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