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Aspartame

Aspartame

Been informed that artificial sweetener called aspartame put in foods and sodas and food stiill make the body react the same as if full sugar ....meaning diet, full sugar sodas are as bad as aspartame sodas ......truth not guesses please ?

A DiabetesTeam Member said:

Not true for "everyone or even most".

There are a bunch of artificial sweeteners (chemical concoctions) and "sugar alcohols" (which are neither sugar nor alcohol - come primarily from "natural sugars" in fruits and veggies) that are used to sweeten "sugar free or no sugar added" products. You really have to read labels because “no sugar added" doesn’t mean there is no sugar or no sugar effect for Diabetics.

There has been much debate about their safety and effect on blood sugar.

All the ones currently on the market/used in consumer products have been deemed either Safe or GRAS (generally regarded as safe) by the FDA (and the European version of the FDA) up to a certain (tested) quantity (which is something like the equivalent of what you would consume in 3 dozen cans of soda a day).

The artificial sweeteners (aspartame, sucralose etc) generally do not cause a sugar spike in "most" diabetics because they don't actually contain "any form of sugar" in them to cause a spike.

The sugar alcohols (erythritol/xylitol etc) "may" cause a sugar spike because they are derived from natural sugar sources (other than cane sugars), so while they do have some form of natural sugar in them, different ones are either not absorbed or are absorbed at a very slow rate - others are almost as potent as cane sugar.

The sugar alcohols may have a "glycemic index" which indicates how they would effect your blood sugar compared to "real sugar".

As an example Erythritol has a GI of zero (no effect) while Maltitol is only has about a 30% “less effect” on your blood sugar compared to real sugar. So while Erythritol is “diabetic safe”, Maltitol is great for prevent rotten teeth but not Diabetes friendly as a substitute.

So the answer is "artificial sweeteners" contain "nothing" that "should" spike your sugar. Sugar Alcohols do contain something that could minimally raise, spike, or not raise your blood sugar at all. If your body reacts "negatively" to something in the artificial sweetener your blood sugar could rise due to your "reaction to the product" and not the product itself (subtle difference, but important).

If in doubt do a stick test before and two hours post consuming the product to see how it effects "you". Aspartame, Sucralose, Erythritol and Xylitol don't even cause a "blip" on my meter. Maltitol blows my numbers through the roof - may as well have drank a double sugar drink - you have to test to know....

posted 3 months ago
A DiabetesTeam Member said:

I use stevia and splenda for my homemade iced tea or lemonade and hubby coffee.

posted 3 months ago
A DiabetesTeam Member said:

Very true!!! Actually, fake sugar is worse than real sugar. just google side affects of fake sugars. There are many.

posted 2 months ago
A DiabetesTeam Member said:

I really dislike that fake sugar, for me it has a disgustingly sickly sweet taste!!
Yes regular soda is bad for you, but when there’s nothing else and I’m having a low blood sugar I would drink it....

posted 3 months ago
A DiabetesTeam Member said:

I have used Stevia before which seems to be more natural form of sweetener with no adverse effect on me but Canderel with Aspartame definitely increased my glucose levels which was a surprise for me. Then i completely stopped using it and its just waiting to be thrown off. Actually will do it right now!! 🙃

posted 3 months ago
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