Overview
Metaglip is a prescription drug approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to help improve blood glucose control in adults with type 2 diabetes. Metaglip is considered an adjunct treatment to diet and exercise.

Metaglip is a combination drug composed of the drugs Glipizide, the active ingredient in Glucotrol, and Metformin. Glipizide is a sulfonylurea. Glipizide is believed to work by increasing the amount of insulin released by the pancreas. Metformin is a biguanide. Metformin is believed to work by decreasing the amount of glucose produced by the liver and making the muscle tissue more sensitive to insulin.

How do I take it?... read more

Prescribing information states that Metaglip is generally taken once or twice daily with meals.

Metaglip comes in tablet form.

Side effects
The FDA-approved label for Metaglip lists common side effects including nausea, diarrhea, stomach upset, head aches, and muscle aches.

Rare but serious side effects listed for Metaglip include lactic acidosis (when the tissues and blood become too acidic) and systemic allergic reaction.

For answers to frequently asked questions about exposure to Metformin during pregnancy and breastfeeding, visit the experts at MothertoBaby.org.

Metaglip (Glipizide/Metformin) Questions

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