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Real members of DiabetesTeam have posted questions and answers that support our community guidelines, and should not be taken as medical advice. Looking for the latest medically reviewed content by doctors and experts? Visit our resource section.

Blood Sugars

Blood Sugars

Good morning. Folks have been talking about A1C levels. Blood sugar levels are daily sticks. A1C is a blood draw that is sent to the lab. From what I'm reading, it sounds like folks are doing A1C levels at home. Is there a home test for it?

A DiabetesTeam Member said:

Johanne explained well what you are (probably) seeing - just the metric blood sugars that "look like" A1C levels.

However, there is a way to calculate your A1C level based on your home readings (but does require a conversion calculator).

So many times if someone posts up there weekly average, I will throw that into the calculator and can give some indication of what A1C would be based on that average...

posted over 1 year ago
A DiabetesTeam Member said:

If you have a CVS pharmacy, they have at home A1C tests.

posted 8 months ago
A DiabetesTeam Member said:

Oh no you must go to your Dr or lab to get your A1C . I went to my Dr.the pass week and had mines done and mines was down to 7 from the last 3 months being 11.5

posted over 1 year ago
A DiabetesTeam Member said:

Canada and UK use the metric system which is why you see numbers such as this morning my fbs (fasting blood sugar) was 5.4 (mmol/L), to convert to USA values you need to multiply by 18. So 5.4 X 18 = 97 (mg/dL).

Now the A1C is % number which to many USA people might seem that we are getting our A1C every day.

A1C for USA & Canada is the same % value
A1C in UK is in mmol/mol so their numbers appear higher then ours & in double digits

So it can be confusing.

Now some of us sometimes posts that according to our average sugar levels our A1C might be around a certain %, that is because we use charts online that give you an estimate according to your daily / weekly / monthly / 90 days average sugar levels that some of our meters gives us (CGM or Libre) or some new glucometer will give you an average sugar level also, then we go to those charts found online and look up our average number and get an estimated A1C number in % for Can and USA.

It can get confusing at times, which is why some of us post our 5.4 (97), which parethesis is the equivalent for USA, those in USA parenthesis is the equivalent to Can & UK.

Now to convert our numbers you use 18. Can & UK we have to divide USA numbers by 18

USA have to multiply our numbes by 18. That is how you get the equivalence.

Hope this helps clear up some posts for you all

edited, originally posted over 1 year ago
A DiabetesTeam Member said:

Excellent!!

posted about 1 year ago
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