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Real members of DiabetesTeam have posted questions and answers that support our community guidelines, and should not be taken as medical advice. Looking for the latest medically reviewed content by doctors and experts? Visit our resource section.

Testing Supplies

Testing Supplies

I’m wondering what type of testing supplies y’all are using. I’ve used all kinds, but after 6 years of working at my local Walmart pharmacy (I’m not working right now, but was working for Ruger, the gun manufacturer, before the cancer), I learned about Relion brand supplies.

At first I started using Relion Prime, which worked just as well for me as did the more expensive brands (your doctor will give you a meter for free, but the test strips are outrageous). After comparing them side by side… read more

A DiabetesTeam Member said:

@A DiabetesTeam Member, absolutely, insurance is a Godsend! I had to come out of work after the chemo-spurred neuropathy caused me to not be able to do my job - and being without insurance, even for a few months, is devastating. The insurance that I have now pays 100% for generics, and my copay for brand is $30 - MUCH better than full price!

posted almost 2 years ago
A DiabetesTeam Member said:

I do not know about Ontario pricing, but for me I buy my strips online at Diabetes Express, needles I have so many as I had bought a lot before using the Libre, so I am stocked up on those.

Their customer service is awesome also, usually receive supplies within 2 days, but with covid it has changed a bit but if I order Monday by Friday usually it is here. I once ordered a meter along with extra strips and they only sent me the 100 strips that came with the meter, I called and 2 days later I had the missing 100 sent to me no extra cost. For me the strips are less then sold in pharmacies here in Quebec. They are also the only ones who have those precision strips that you can use on the Libre scanner machine (Usually people use the blood port to check if accuracy with the Libre, but you can use as a meter also. My Libre meter matches what my true blood tests were on the day they were drawn and were between 0.2 to 0.5 from Libre readings. So I now use my Libre meter, I only use the other ones if I run out of strips or to test Arm or Nathan which is rare. Here is their links. They also sell other diabetes supplies and Libre accessories.

https://diabetesexpress.ca/

posted almost 2 years ago
A DiabetesTeam Member said:

I use accu chek but my insurance covers it 100% so i have no charge. This is good info for those that have no insurance or too jigh of a copay

posted almost 2 years ago
A DiabetesTeam Member said:

Hum R regular = fast acting. Humulin N or Nph is a slower long acting one. Been 15 yrs since I administered insulin to patients other then R and only twice in 15 yrs, patients on dialysis tend to go hypo, so very rarely did they require any, unless they arrived with levels above 25 (450). Wow If I remember from 35 yrs ago, most patients were on Nph as a standard dose and R was given as a rapid insulin (given with meals according to sliding scales prescription). Wow it has been a while R and N exist, as a student nurse in the late 1980's I used to administer it also.

posted almost 2 years ago
A DiabetesTeam Member said:

@A DiabetesTeam Member, they’re just different strengths of Humilin. I know that R stands for Regular, and 70/30 is a mix of Humilin and another insulin, but not sure what the N stands for. Your doctor would know.

posted almost 2 years ago
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