When you were first diagnosed, what information resources did your doctor provide to help manage your type 2 diabetes?

When you were first diagnosed, what information resources did your doctor provide to help manage your type 2 diabetes?

A DiabetesTeam Member said:

I called the American Diabetes Association. They have an 800 number. They are a great resource and a wealth of knowledge. They sent up a lot of information via the postal mail. Joined a support group and call the local hospital (they are too a good resource to have; they can give you los of suggestions). Visited a dietician helped me a lot too. Keep positive attitude important

posted over 2 years ago
A DiabetesTeam Member said:

I have been a Diabetic for the last 15 years! In addition I am recently recovering from my 2ndMI n May 2016.
I am 69 years old and had to retire in December 2016 due to my cardiac health.
Managing diabetes is Avery challenging tasks. Everyone has some sort of advice for you ,but they are not the ones living in your shoes.
My way of coping with this dreadful condition has been to do things in moderation. Never over indulge.
Do a lot of research on your meds and do not miss a dose regardless of how you feel or what side effects you are having. Stay in control.
I wish you all the very best. Enjoy life!

posted over 2 years ago
A DiabetesTeam Member said:

One thing I learned from a diabetic nurse particularly if you like butter is to whip a half cup butter with one cup of olive oil. I have avoided margarine and use this as it is spreadable. I also use it for cooking and baking bread. Just keep it in the frig. Yes there is calories and fat however it's healthier than margarine.

posted over 2 years ago
A DiabetesTeam Member said:

I was diagnosed 23 years ago. They said you have diabetes, cut out bread and potatoes from your diet and walk a mile a day.Then rescheduled an appt for 6 months. I had no idea what testing was, why it was important, what the A1c was or what it meant. It wasn't so much what they did not say, as the attitude they presented, the no worries, not a big deal, etc. just take this pill and you'll be fine. In large part, the reason I ignored the disease for almost 20 years. Of course having no idea what the consequences of that would be. And otherwise having not much info, nor sources of research. While computers have been around for some time now, it is only in the last 4 years that we had computers in our home, or mini ones, computers/smart phones in our home. Honestly, the doctor never really informed me of all the possibilities with this disease, so I did not have any knowledge or concern about them. Things have changed greatly in my diet, but it is to little, to late. I have many, serious complications. I strongly urge everyone to do their research, become your own expert on your particular body. Avoid complications that can kill you like kidney failure, blindness, very serious abdominal and digestive issues, neuropathy, and on and on. And please, understand that these complications do not go away and progressively get worse and worse.

posted over 2 years ago
A DiabetesTeam Member said:

I am truly surprised reading all of these answers. I would suggest to any patient whose Dr., upon the new diagnosis of diabetes, did not at the very least offer dietary counseling, discuss the need for dietary control as well is medication and discuss the complications associated with diabetes and the goals of treatment in terms of desirable glycohemoglobin levels, to find another primary care physician! Additionally if you do not feel that you can ask your physician questions and receive honest answers, then by all means seek another physician. I practiced for 40 years, and I held myself to that standard. I further hold all of my physicians to date to that standard.

posted over 2 years ago
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